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Evolution of Aerial Photography Market


Before 2013, aerial photography was expensive and could only be used in big productions.
The advent of the RC controlled quadcopter changed everything.

Before 2010

Helicopters and cranes

Aerial photography was expensive and could only be used in big productions.

2013

RC controlled quadcopter

The first years, due to lack of skilled pilots and to first hard-to-control RC drones, incidents were very frequent.

2015

Drones everywhere

Aerial photography is commonly used in weddings, construction, civil engineering and real estate video.

2017

"Smart Drones"

Drones can now trace routes, follow targets, avoid obstacles. Expensive gimbal and camera gear can safely be mounted on such drones.

2020

Outbreak control

During Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, drones are used to track people and broadcast messages in urban areas.

Major players

In such a burgeoning market, we find a lot of products come and go, many of them with a brief life span and very few units operating. While we may not have repaired footage from all those models, we are confident about being able to repair any drone footage ever recorded.
Failure modes, methods of repair and pricing are similar in all devices.

DJI Drones: the market leader

From some estimates, DJI has between a 60% and 70% drone marketshare within the consumer space (and growing). Fortunately, for all of those customers that enjoy recording videos while flying their DJI drone, we have developed some repair techniques to repair their clips in case some unexpected landing occurs.

See dedicated DJI section in our Movie Repair Guide.


Besides traditional H.264/AVC video format, DJI drones also support other formats:
Zenmuse cameras can do H.265/HEVC, and for high-end needs, Apple ProRes, ProRes RAW, and CinemaDNG as well.



Yuneec Drones: a challenger

Yuneec International is a Chinese aircraft manufacturer. Yuneec markets its man-carrying aircraft in the United States through GreenWing International. Invested by Intel Corporation and with a retail partnership with Best Buy, they developed a 3-axis gimbal to be used with GoPro cameras as well as Intel RealSense 3D depth camera technology which tracks depth and human motion.

The Typhoon series is their best seller model being able to deliver an excellent flying experience both for casual and professional customers.

Despite not being seen in a while, we processed enough samples to be able to repair damaged files from those drones in case required.



Hubsan Drones: recreational

Hubsan is also a Chinese aircraft manufacturer that oriented their production mostly to a casual costumer. Their portfolio is divided in three categories (FPV, Quadcopter and Racing) that covers almost all needs that a recreational use of their drones might demand.

Top notch model is the H109S X4 PRO PROFESSIONAL able to Real Time FPV, Waypoint navigation and FullHD (1080p) camera with 3 Axis Gimbal.

Pilots can rest assured as we got you covered in case any crash or damaged file ever happens.

Try Treasured on your own corrupted drone files!

Our service offers:

  • FREE diagnostics and preview with Treasured
  • FREE sample of repaired video
  • Try before you buy with a FREE trial of your Repair Kit
  • Enjoy FREE customer support by speaking directly with our trained experts
  • Invaluable expertise, dedication and second to none customer service
Video Repair app online

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Categories and verticals

Drone market is a thrilling evolving field that covers full range of purposes. Drones are hard to categorize. The drones (hardware) themselves are multi purpose and can be used as a tool for any function. Above categorization is done based on how each drone company talked about themselves on their home page (see the areas under “commercial”).

It’s interesting to see a few drone companies verticalize and provide the hardware, tools, software, and analysis for a specific market. For example Sky Futures is for oil and gas, Avetics is for film and photography, etc. There is a whole ecosystem developing around the hardware of drones including: insurance, fleet management, marketplaces, data analytics for drone data, etc.

source: medium - Chris McCann